Cynicism – the Easy Way Out

At its heart, cynicism is the easy way out.

Cynicism allows us to make snap judgments because we have decided in advance that certain people, certain groups, are not only not to be trusted, but they have nothing to say that might be reasonable.

Cynicism saves time. Cynics don’t need to spend time thinking about the merits of other viewpoints. Their minds are already made up.

Cynics don’t have to take the risk their opponents might have some good motives, though perhaps misguided.

Cynics don’t have to think too hard. Their tools for dismissing the thoughts of others are always conveniently at the ready. Press secretaries, celebrities, and politicians all have “talking points.” This is how we descend into using The Big Lie. The Big Lie was a propaganda technique used by Hitler. We are inundated with Big Lies in this media saturated world.

A few weeks back, a friend of mine quoted Joshua Storment on his Facebook page. It made me think about how easy it is be a cynic.

        “It is interesting that in the Bible, the idea for cynicism is something like a “scoffer.” They are the fool. This is not what we normally associate with cynics. Cynics, in our world, are more likely to be seen as the only ones who aren’t fools. The person who is able to quickly deconstruct is the wisest in the room, and maybe they are…but not if they don’t know what they don’t know.
Cynicism makes the subtle leap from maybe to certainty, from some to all. People can’t be trusted, bankers do it for money, politicians do it for power, and God is just a word people use to feel better about death, impose their will on others, or get their Aunt Betty to die without freaking out.
Cynicism is so toxic, because it tends to presents itself as wisdom. The Bible calls it what it is…foolish.” Jonathan Storment. (Read more of his work here: http://jonathanstorment.com/)

The sentence about stereotyping – bankers do it for the money, politicians do it for the power….So easy just to plug people into their slots. No sense in getting to know the heart of a politician, or listen to why someone could be a Christian feminist.

Cynicism allows us to smear those with opposing views with a broad brush. All Pro lifers are smeared with of the killing of abortion clinic workers. Those who support choice are smeared with the dirty abortion clinic shut down in Muskegon County last year.

We are in the midst of the season that germinated this blog – the run up to an election. I started writing this blog in response to the cynical lies generated by both sides during the 2012 election. It wore me out, made me feel sick.

As a byproduct or maybe the product, the lies multiply in all forms of media during election season. For the sake of power, all manner of cynical lies are passed off as truth. Passing legislation in the U.S. is sort of like making sausage. A little bit of this, a little bit of that is added to each major piece of legislation. So the Affordable Health Care Act ballooned to thousands of pages. So did the Americans with Disabilities Acts. This is how the pork is obtained for each legislator’s home districts. A grant for researching the lives of spiders is inserted into law, a new bridge is funded, a new tax deduction is added for chicken farmers, etc. So Justin Amash is accused of refusing to vote against gender based abortion, when he may have been voting against new taxes or the exorbitant cost of a new military helicopter. He is a libertarian after all. Brian Ellis is accused of foolish spending when he served on the East Grand Rapids School Board, when he really was doing what he thought was best for the students of that district. As voters, we need to consider the record as a whole, not just one small part, or even one mistake. What is the overwhelming pattern in our representative’s work.

When I read Joshua Storment’s words, I realized that cynicism is not only easy, it’s lazy.

In some ways, it is the opposite of Love. Love takes work, thought, patience. Love takes risks. Jesus calls on us to love our enemies and pray for those who spitefully oppose us.

Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” (I Corinthians 13:4-6, from the Bible, New International Version)

 

 

Echoes of An Angel

Echoes of an Angel is the story of Ben Underwood, a young man who lost his eyesight due to retinal cancer and then learned to find his way around in the world using human echolocation. (Echolocation is sending out sound (clicking) and listening to the echo to find objects) Due to echolocation, Ben could ride a bike, roller blade, and get himself around without the aid of a cane, among many other amazing feats. He became world famous and made appearances on The Oprah Winfrey Show, the Today Show, and was invited to speak around the world.

Ben was also remarkable for his positive attitude and faith in Christ.

Just as remarkable in my opinion is story of his mother, Aquanetta Gordon and her journey in raising her “handicapped” son.

The Lord spoke three things to Aquanetta on the morning three-year-old Ben underwent surgery to have his second eye removed due to retinal cancer, rendering him completely blind.

  • Ben will live and not die
  • Ben will see again
  • And this isn’t for you

Aquanetta’s story demonstrates how these words played out in her life. Ben did live through the surgery. Despite total, irreversible blindness, the degree to which he was able to see, both spiritually and physically, was amazing. And she felt that the gift that was Ben was not for her benefit, but  to all of those who knew him, and to the glory of God.

I was interested in this book because I also have raised children with special needs. Aquanetta’s goal for Ben was to raise him to be as independent as possible.  She didn’t want him to be handicapped by his condition. She expected just as much from him as from her other children. And while she gladly worked with his therapists, teachers, and schools, she also let them know when they overstepped their bounds. She was a very good advocate for Ben.

This book provides an unblinking look at Aquanetta’s troubled past, as well as the difficulties of dealing with retinal cancer and the blindness that followed. Aquanetta tells us about her tears, her fears, and frustrations; but also about the ways that God worked in her life and Ben’s life. God used many people to encourage her, Ben being one of the biggest encouragers.

I enjoyed this book and recommend it.

***(I received a free copy of this book from Tyndale Momentum in exchange for my review).

 

 

 

 

 

D-Day

“When you find yourself getting cynical, think of these men.”
President Barack Obama, Normandy, France. June 6, 2014.

I woke up this morning to these words at about 5:00 a.m.

Instead of their normal morning news, Fox 17 in Grand Rapids chose to broadcast the President’s speech in Normandy, France, this morning at the 70th anniversary of D-day. A good choice in my opinion.

He called them liberators. They gave everything so that we could be free.

Never forget.

memorials

A Summer Without The News?

Seems radical, doesn’t it?

When I was in college, one of my roommates never watched the news. She said it was too stressful and interfered with her sleep. That just didn’t make sense to me 30 years ago. How could you go about your life without knowing “what was going on? ” I couldn’t imagine myself being that ill informed. It makes sense now, though.

I started this blog in an effort to reduce the cynicism in my life. I realized it was a downward  drag on my life, and made me a bad influence on those around me. During the 2012 election, the cynical, lying ads from all sides of the political spectrum made me sick. So I decided that I was going on a journey – away from cynicism.

One way to combat cynicism is to control what goes into your mind. So, I stopped watching all cable TV news (which is generally an advertisement for one side or the other). Now when I turn on Fox News or CNN, I feel assaulted by either the whining or the shouting and turn it off after five minutes. Ugh. I still watch the local news, especially in the morning when it is “lighter.”

My friend posted a blog about giving up all news for the summer – a sabbatical from the news, so to speak –  http://trinkaj.blogspot.com/2014/05/a-news-free-summer.html.

Could I do it? Could you?

I am thinking about following my friend’s lead.

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Gifts From My Mother

My mother made a crocheted bag for me. I told her that she could sell them for $40 in boutiques. But she just enjoyed crocheting these and and enjoyed giving them away.  She is 79 now, and her hands shake too much to crochet anymore.

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She lined them, which made them extra nice.

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When my parents moved to Florida 18 years ago, my mother and father sold most of their furniture and household items. But they gave a few items to me and my siblings. The furniture they gave me wore out, but I still have this wonderful, heavy gauge pot, which in my house is used to make chicken and dumplings. The lid used to have a handle on the top made of an old wooden thread spool. A wonderful gift, and I think of my mother when I use it.

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When my parents entered their 40s, they took up new hobbies. My father began running, inspired by Jim Fix’s book, The Complete Book of Running. He ran the 10k River Bank Run in Grand Rapids for many years. My mother took an oil painting class when she was 40, and began painting landscapes, and giving them away as gifts. When they went camping in their RV, my mother would stand outside the camper at her easel painting. Many of the walkers in the campground would stop by to have a chat and see what she was up to. She was a very shy person, so this was a way to meet people.

The painting in the picture below is a gift from her, which hangs on a wall in my house. When I look at it, I remember a fishing trip to Mud Lake in the northern lower peninsula with my family and grandparents. There were black, dead trees in the water and along the shore. My brother told me that the lake had formed suddenly from a sinkhole, taking trees with it. There are a lot of sinkholes up north.

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The true gift of this painting is my parents’ sense of adventure and trying new things at their age. As I have gone through my 40s, I also started new things – going back to school, starting a new career, picking up the writing pen once again.

Do you have any gifts which have inspired you?

A Blessing

A couple of nights ago, I read a blog post on the elegance of bad poetry.* And it reminded me of an awful wonderful poem written by our friend, Pat Anton. Pat and Chris Anton were the master and mistress of ceremonies at our wedding. When Rick came to Grand Rapids from Lafayette, Indiana, to attend electronics school, he had nothing to his name. The Antons, along with many other people from Bethany Bible Church took him in, and were family to him. He became a Christian at Bethany.

At our wedding reception, Chris Anton read Pat’s poem to everyone:

It’s a Special Day, You’ll all agree
One we thought we’d never see.

The day that Rick would beam and glow
To be the hit of this particular show.

We all remember, if we take the time
When Rick appeared without a dime.

He became something special to everyone
We shared his laughter, his trials and fun.

We tried to help him in every way
Watching him grow, day by day.

And grow he did in his spiritual life
But he was always looking for a wife.

But God had someone hid away
And Rick had to wait day after day.

I want to do something with my life
Pastor suggested Word of Life.

Pat agreed —Word of Life.
We’ll send you there to find a wife.

But God had someone hid away
And Rick had to wait day after day.

Then on to College and still no direction
So back to Bethany with God’s protection.

Serving the church and serving the Lord.
But so unhappy and so very bored.

What shall I do? He used to say.
And Pat would say in her knowing way.

For every Jack, there’s a Jill.
If one won’t, the other will.

Great, said Rick, but when and where?
Hang on Rick and don’t despair.

But God had someone hid away
And Rick had to wait day after day.

And wait he did until one night
When there appeared a Glorious sight.

Look! He said, the girl for me.
She’s pretty, She’s smart, her name is Cindy.

Here was Someone God Hid away
No more waiting day after day.

It didn’t take long for us to know
Rick had acquired a special glow.

And when we saw it wasn’t one sided,
Everyone got real excited.

The Date was set and finally arrived
Here sits Rick with a wife at his side.

Tonight we salute Rick and his wife.
May God bless them all of their life.

Pat Anton, June 1985.

It was a precious gift to us.

Pat and Chris Anton

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*”The undoubted grandeur of really bad poetry” (http://universitydiary.wordpress.com/2014/03/11/the-undoubted-grandeur-of-really-bad-poetry/)